San Jose Business Lawyers Blog

Articles Posted in Partnerships

If you’re thinking about starting a nonprofit, there are some steps to take before you begin. Forming a nonprofit organization is much like starting a regular corporation, except there are several additional steps you must take to ensure tax-exempt status, which includes a rigorous application process. Here are some common questions and their answers about forming a nonprofit organization.

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Forming a Nonprofit Organization: Common Questions and Answers

What does ‘501(c)3’ mean?

Being a 501(c)3 corporation means a company has been approved by the IRS as a charitable organization, exempt from specified taxes. The IRS may grant your nonprofit organization tax-exempt status if the nonprofit was formed for religious, charitable, scientific, literary or educational purposes, so long as the nonprofit does not distribute profits to individuals above reasonable compensation. Continue Reading

Are you thinking about starting a business? The success or failure of your business venture depends on your ability to plan ahead, take action, and respond to what happens after your idea becomes a company. Here are 4 actions to consider on your path to business success.
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Building a Successful Business: 4 Steps
1. Clearly Define Your Vision and Goals

Business success comes through hard work and dedication. Having a clear vision and measurable goals is the first step. Write down your plans for the future of your company, both short term and long term. It can also be helpful to scout out your competition to see if your plans will hold up in the market. This is known as market research, and it will allow you to identify whether a similar product or idea is already out on the market. Continue Reading

Among the most important decisions a business owner or entrepreneur can make is determining what business entity best suits their needs. This decision can affect how much you pay in taxes, the amount of paperwork that you will need to do, your own personal liability, and your ability to raise capital by issuing stock. Additionally, some business formations require certain formalities in order to be in compliance with state and federal law.

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Of course, every business is different, and what may be an appropriate business entity for one venture may be completely inappropriate for another. Business ventures that anticipate rapid growth or are formed with the intention of being acquired by another company may choose an entity type that may be unnecessarily onerous at startup but allow growth and compliance with federal securities laws, preempting the need for a potentially costly reorganization down the road. For these and other reasons, it is best for anyone considering forming a business entity to discuss their goals and options with an experienced Silicon Valley business lawyer before filing any paperwork with the state.

In the meantime, here is some basic information regarding the some of the most commonly used business formations:

Sole Proprietorships – A sole proprietorship is perhaps the most common type of business that exists today, and many people may own one without knowing it. Sole proprietors are simply individuals who engage in some sort of business venture for themselves. There are no filing requirements to start a sole proprietorship, and they may even do business under an assumed name if they choose to file a fictitious name with the state. One of the main drawbacks of sole proprietorships is that the owner can be held personally liable for all obligations incurred by the business.

Partnerships – A partnership involves two or more people who work together in a common enterprise and share in the profits and losses of that enterprise. Like sole proprietorships, partnerships can be formed without any state filings, and can actually be formed with a simple oral agreement. In some cases, a court may even determine the existence of a partnership even in the absence of an agreement. All partners are jointly and severally liable for the financial obligations of the partnership and profits or losses pass through to the partners for the purposes of taxation.

Corporations – A corporation is a legal entity separate from its owners created to conduct business. Because it is a separate entity, a corporation has the benefit of shielding its owners from personal liability for the debts or other obligations incurred by the corporation. One of the main disadvantages of a corporation is the legal requirements associated with formation and ongoing operations, which make them better suited to large, well-established businesses.

Limited Liability CompaniesLimited Liability Companies are a relatively new business formation favored by many startups and small businesses because they combine the flexibility of partnerships with the liability protection of corporations. An LLC has the same limited personal liability as a corporation that is provided by state law and gets treated as a Partnership for Federal tax law purposes.

Choosing a business formation can be a complicated decision with far-reaching implications on the success and operation of your business. If you have any questions at all regarding business formation or any other matter related to business law, the skilled lawyers at Structure Law Group can help you. Please do not hesitate to call us today at (408) 441-7500 for assistance today.

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.

contract.jpgAny business with multiple owners should have a buy-sell agreement. A buy-sell agreement, provides order and clarity should anything happen to one of the owners. In this post we’ll take a look at buy-sell agreements, how they work and what to include.

Understanding an Agreement

Let’s say you and some family members get together and form a corporation or an LLC. Things are going pretty well, the business is making money and everyone is happy. Then something happens, maybe one of your family members dies or simply decides to leave the business. What happens to that person’s stake in your company? A business without a buy-sell agreement can easily fall into in fighting and costly litigation, not to mention the impact on consumer confidence.

How to Craft a Buy-Sell Agreement

Really, the first thing you should do once you start thinking about forming a corporation, LLC or partnership is to hire an attorney. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t start talking with each other about what to include in a buy-sell agreement. Generally, you’ll want to list the conditions that would lead one owner to buy out another. This can be anything from death to termination. You’ll also want to outline the process for transferring ownership. Will the owners purchase the shares with their own money or will it be done through the business? Also, how will the sale price be determined? Some companies negotiate that upfront while others use a formula.

It’s important to be detail oriented. You and your fellow owners should understand each part of the agreement. You don’t want to be surprised later on when one of the owners sues you for paying in installments instead of one lump sum. The more specific the better. In the end, a buy-sell agreement may not only save your business, it may save your relationships.

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.

hands.jpgA strategic alliance is a fairly simple concept. Two companies with similar interests join forces to produce favorable outcomes for all involved. An everyday example is the Starbucks inside of Barnes and Noble bookstores. This move helped Starbucks expand, but it also kept people in the bookstore, perhaps reading the first few pages of a book they were thinking of buying. A strategic alliance is good for business, but you’ll need to take the proper steps to make it work.

1,2,3 – The Steps to Creating a Strategic Alliance for Your Company

Step 1: Choosing a Partner

Companies create a strategic alliance to help increase their profits. A solid partnership is one that generates revenue that couldn’t be achieved by going it alone. Therefore, it’s important to pick a partner you trust and that has a solid reputation. Also, a strategic alliance is a long-term commitment. Results are monitored over years, not months, so be sure the company you pick is one you can work with for the foreseeable future.

Step 2: Crafting a Deal

Perhaps the most important part of this step is determining a strategy. How will you go about achieving your goals over the next 3-5 years? This is also the time to set boundaries and determine roles. It’s critical that you and your potential partner agree on such things like operation details and rules for intellectual property.

Step 3: Making it Work

Remember, these are two companies with two different ways of doing things. To make your alliance work you’ll need to cultivate relationships. You’ll need to know who’s in charge and what happens when something unexpected happens. The way you handle a particular situation may be different than your strategic alliance partner.

The best way to avoid confrontation is by creating a clear contract. A good contract will outline roles and responsibilities as well as provide an “out” should the alliance fall apart. The team at Structure Law Group can craft an agreement that satisfies such objectives. By putting everything in writing you protect your company legally from any problems that may arise.

Have questions about creating a strategic alliance for your company? Contact Structure Law Group today!

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.

scale.jpgWith any luck, you or your business will never end up the subject of a lawsuit. Since this isn’t a perfect world, it’s best to start thinking about what to do if the unforeseen happens. Like most things, business litigation is an involved issue. We can’t go through the entire process in one post, so we’ll start with three basic steps to take if you find yourself in legal trouble.

Step 1: Purchase Liability Insurance

This step should happen long before trouble starts. In reality, this is one of the first things you should do as a business owner. Liability insurance protects the purchaser from the risks of liabilities imposed by lawsuits and similar claims. Say a customer slips on a wet spot in your store; your insurance would step in and handle the costs. You may want to add extra protection such as errors and omissions coverage. For businesses that have a Board of Directors it’s a good idea to have directors and officers coverage. This type of coverage protects the corporation as well as the personal liabilities for the directors and officers of the corporation.

Step 2: Separate Yourself from Your Business

Sole proprietorships are a popular business structure. Unfortunately, these entities can leave you personally exposed. In this arrangement your personal property, including your home or car, are fair game in a lawsuit. To avoid this you want to create separation by forming a trust, or consider an alternative business structure. A trust is a legal entity that pays its own taxes and can own assets. Making the trust the legal owner of the business safeguards your money and property. Also, consider forming a corporation. Trusts and corporations are miles apart in terms of regulation but offer protection to the individual.

Step 3: Hire a Good Attorney

Of course it is always advisable to have an attorney on your side before any litigation to avoid potential lawsuits. If all else fails and you are served with the lawsuit, you should immediately consult your attorney. Time is of the essence. A quality attorney can help you through the initial steps.

Finally, it’s a good idea to hire lawyers who specialize in specific fields. If you’re served with a lawsuit or anticipating one then it’s smart to hire an attorney familiar with litigation like the professionals at Structure Law Group.

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.

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Converting a limited liability company to a corporation is a relatively easy process. Before I take you through the steps, let’s take a quick look at the differences between the two types of business structures.

3 Differences Between Limited Liability Companies and Corporations

1. LLCs are formed by one or more people (members). These members file Articles of Organization and craft an Operating Agreement. Corporations file similar paperwork. However, unlike LLCs, corporations have shareholders and governing bodies like a Board of Directors.

2. Corporations have the ability to offer preferred stock which can be desirable to investors, including angel investors and venture capital investors. LLCs do not have a recognized class of preferred ownership.

3. LLCs are subject to a gross receipt fee based on the gross revenues of the company. This fee is charged based on the gross receipts, irrespective of whether the company had net income or a net loss. Corporations by comparison are taxed on net income.

Converting an LLC to a Corporation

Now that I’ve gone over some of the key differences, it’s time to talk about converting your limited liability company into a corporation. There are details specific to your company, but in general the process is pretty straightforward.

1. Adopt a plan of conversion. Here you’ll need to address some key questions like the name of your new corporation and how you plan to convert membership interests into shares.

2. Craft a statement of conversion. The statement needs to include the following: the name of your LLC, the Secretary of State’s file number for your LLC, documentation that your plan of conversion was approved by the LLC’s members and is compliant with California law.

Once these tasks have been completed and approved, your LLC is now a corporation – but don’t think you’re done. You’ll need to draft bylaws, elect officers and directors, hold an initial board meeting and issue stock certificates. The team at Structure Law Group can help you with the transition. You can find more information about our services by clicking on this link.

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.

llc.jpgLimited liability companies combine parts of both corporations and partnerships. Because they’re a hybrid, LLC’s can be more difficult to setup. One part of this process involves choosing a management structure to fit your specific LLC.

Single Member or Multiple Member LLC

The difference here is implied in the name. Single member LLC’s have only one owner, while multiple member LLC’s have at least two. Choosing one over the other typically comes down to financing. Starting a single member LLC comes with a higher level of risk as the profits and losses are reported on the individual’s tax return. However, as the sole owner, you don’t have the stress of running a company with another person.

Member Managed LLC or Manager Managed LLC

This type of structure only applies to Multiple Member LLC’s. If both owners (members) plan to be actively involved in the business, then a member managed LLC is the best choice. In this scenario each owner can act on behalf of the company. A manager managed LLC is a good option if you have investors who don’t plan on being involved. These silent partners typically elect the owners to run the day-to-day operations of the company.

Operating Agreement

Whatever you do, make sure to put it in writing. An operating agreement outlines the particulars of your business and helps to ensure your status as a limited liability company. A good operating agreement should include: powers and duties of members, distribution of profits and losses, buyout and buy-sell rules, ownership percentages and voting rights.

It should be noted that California recently revised the Uniform Limited Liability Company Act or RULLCA. The revised act specifically addressed operating agreements. New details were added concerning which RULLCA sections can be, and which cannot be, overridden by the operating agreement. Also, more detail was added regarding withdrawal and the consequences of withdrawal of a member from an LLC

Determining which type of company organization to choose can be difficult. Consider hiring an attorney, like the ones at Structure Law Group, to guide you through the process. If you’ve done most of the leg work but need help crafting an operating agreement, the professionals at Structure can help with that too.

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.

If you are an employer in San Jose, you are most likely aware that on January 1, 2014, the minimum wage increased to $10.15 per hour for your business; California’s minimum wage increase was to $9 per hour. In addition to new employment laws, there, there have been other new laws that affect businesses in 2014, such as the all new California limited liability company act. But one law actually applies to all business entities with an Employer Identification Number (“EIN”), including entities such as corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, and even nonprofit organizations. As of January 1, 2014, any entity with an EIN must notify the IRS of a change of (1) a mailing address, (2) a business location or (3) the identity of a “responsible party.” A change in a company’s mailing address or business location is pretty clear, but the identity of a responsible party may not be so clear.

If you are not sure who the “responsible party” was initially, check the Form SS-4 application that was filed initially by the organization to obtain its EIN, and it will be the person or entity listed as responsible on that form. Then, look at the instructions to Form 8822-B to determine if your responsible party has changed. The instructions define a responsible party as “the person who has a level of control over, or entitlement to, the funds or assets in the entity that, as a practical matter, enables the individual, directly or indirectly, to control, manage, or direct the entity and the disposition of its funds and assets.” If the entity’s original responsible party at the time of filing the Form SS-4 is no longer affiliated with the organization or no longer fits that definition, then the entity must use Form 8822-B to let the IRS know.

Form 8822-B must be filed within 60 days of the change. If such a change occurred before January 1, 2014, and the entity has not previously notified the IRS in some other manner, Form 8822-B must be filed before March 1, 2014. If you no longer have a copy of the SS-4 Application or remember who was named as the “responsible party,” you may wish to file a Form 8822-B before March 1, 2014.

So, if you are a corporation or LLC making changes on your Statement of Information filing with the California Secretary of State, or if you are amending your LLC operating agreement or your corporate documents, keep in mind that you may also need to notify the IRS of the change. If you are not sure whether your company needs to notify the IRS or other agencies of changes, or if you have questions regarding the “responsible party” for your business, you may wish to consult with a business lawyer or accountant.

The information appearing in this article does not constitute legal advice or opinion. Such advice and opinion are provided by the firm only upon engagement with respect to specific factual situations. Specific questions relating to this article should be addressed directly to the author.

It is that time of year again. Every year in the fourth quarter, businesses in San Jose and all over the United States are looking at the quickly approaching year-end and trying to figure out what they can do now before it is too late to save on taxes for 2013. This is especially true for small businesses, where every dollar of deduction is important because it hits the owner(s) directly in the pocketbook. My law firm is an LLP, so all items of profit and loss flow through to the partners. Therefore, this is the time of year that I look very carefully at how much money is available and what my law firm is going to need or want to buy in the next few months. Do we need a new copier? Do we want to upgrade our software? If so, let’s do it in December rather than January and get the deduction this year. With this in mind, here are a few things for business owners to consider before 2013 is over.

Purchase Equipment for Your Business

Make your equipment purchases before year-end. In 2013, up to $500,000 of both new and used assets purchased and actually put in use by December 31st can be expensed. This means you get a dollar for dollar deduction this year, without having to depreciate the asset over its useful life. This is really helpful for partners that want a deduction for every dollar spent so that they do not have taxable profits without available cash for distribution. But this benefit is limited. If you purchase and put in place more than $2,000,000 of assets during 2013, the $500,000 expense is phased out on a dollar for dollar basis. These limits will likely be even lower next year, so take advantage of them now.

Make Tenant Improvements on Your Commercial Property

Another tax break set to expire after his year is the 50% bonus depreciation, which allows companies to write off half the cost of new assets with useful lives of 20 years or less, in the first year. This includes interior leasehold improvements for commercial real estate. The remaining 50% is depreciated as usual. So, if you are planning some nice tenant improvements in your office, do them before year-end, just in case Congress does not get around to extending this tax break.

Purchase an SUV for Your Business

Have you been thinking about a new Sport Utility Vehicle? You can deduct most of the cost of new SUVs that are used 100% for business and weigh over 6,000 pounds, in the year of purchase. First, there is the special $25,000 deduction for new SUVs, add to that the 50% bonus depreciation, plus normal depreciation on top of that, and you end up with approximately $46,000 of a $60,000 heavy SUV being deductible this year.

So whether you are a partner in a law firm like me, or a partner in any type of business partnership, or a shareholder in a corporation, do not wait until tax time to look at what deductions are available to you. Start planning now for tax savings later.

Source: The Kiplinger Tax Letter, Vol. 88, No. 18, Aug. 30, 2013

The information appearing in this article does not constitute legal advice or opinion. Such advice and opinion are provided by the firm only upon engagement with respect to specific factual situations. Specific questions relating to this article should be addressed directly to the author.