Pros and Cons of a C Corporation vs. an S Corporation

Pros and Cons of a C Corporation vs. an S Corporation

Selecting a business entity is one of the most important decisions an entrepreneur faces. There are numerous options including sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations. To make things even more complicated, there are two primary types of corporations, each with its own benefits. In order to ensure you choose the best business entity for your purposes, you should always conduct careful research and consult with an experienced California business attorney to discuss your options.

Once you have decided you want to incorporate, your options are to form a regular C Corporation or an S Corporation. Though these two types of corporations are quite similar, there are a few key differences that can determine which one is right for your business.

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3 Similarities between S & C Corporations

The following are a few ways that an S Corporation and C Corporation are alike:

1. Both types of corporations are owned by the shareholders, who have protections from liability for business debts and most business-related legal matters.
2. Both are structured the same way: the shareholder/owners elect a board of directors that oversees major issues. The board of directors then elects officers, who handle the day-to-day operations of the business.

3. Both must comply with state law regarding document filings, fees, bylaw and more.

Differences Between S Corporations and C Corporations

The most important difference between an S Corporation and C Corporation is the way that they are taxed. In both cases, shareholders pay taxes on dividends of any distributions of profits. A C Corporation, however, may also be taxed on the corporate level, which means it may be subject to double taxation. On the other hand, the taxes for an S Corporation all pass-through to the shareholders, so there is only single taxation. This pass-through taxation is authorized by IRS Code, Subchapter S of Chapter 1.

Though the single taxation of an S Corporation likely sounds preferable, the S Corporation entity is not an option for every business. Another difference between the two is that, while a C Corporation can be quite large and have numerous shareholders, an S Corporation may only have a maximum of 100 shareholders. In fact, the IRS created Subchapter S in part to encourage small businesses and entrepreneurship. Therefore, the size of your business may play a significant role in the type of corporate entity you choose.

If you have any questions about C Corporations, S Corporations, or other business entities, do not hesitate to contact an experienced attorney at the Structure Law Group for assistance today.

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.

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