Articles Posted in Business Transactions

AdobeStock_279078466-300x188You’ve probably heard your grandfather complain that he did not patent the “mobile phone” he invented in 1942. If he had, he’d be a billionaire! Ideas come and go, but those who take the leap and protect those ideas often reap the benefits.

Intellectual property” (“IP”) is defined as a unique “product of human intellect” protected by law. Intellectual property can be both in physical form, an idea, or even a design. Algorithms, programming techniques, song lyrics, and books are all forms of intellectual property. Federal law protects intellectual property from being used by unauthorized parties. Protecting business’s intellectual property will help the business maintain the value and benefit from their intellectual property. IP law is complex, and you’ll need the assistance of a Mountain View IP attorney from Structure Law Group to protect your rights under federal intellectual property law.

Types of Intellectual Property

So, you’ve decided to incorporate your business in California and form a corporation. This corporate structure provides multiple benefits in California, including certain California tax benefits and legal protections. Every state has different requirements for forming a corporation, and California is no different. Whether you’re incorporating a new business, a small business converting to a corporation, or a multi-national corporation coming to the states, the experienced corporate attorneys at Structure Law Group, LLP can help. Contact our experienced business attorneys at 408-441-7500 or online to schedule your free corporate consultation.

Types of Corporate Entities in California 

There are multiple types of business entities in California. From a sole proprietorship to a general stock corporation, you must choose the entity that’s right for you. Once you elect to form a California corporation, you must choose which type of corporation best suits your business. California recognizes the following types of corporations:

In the Silicon Valley technology sector, intellectual property is more than just a buzzword. It is an asset with the potential to generate significant income for years to come. Intellectual property includes patents, copyrights, and trademarks. Many employers protect their intellectual property with invention assignment agreements and confidentiality agreements.

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What types of Agreement can be used to protect my company’s intellectual property?

There are many different types of agreements that employers can use to protect their intellectual property. The appropriate one for your business depends on what specific protections your business wishes to enact. An invention assignment agreement is a contract that establishes the employer’s ownership over all creations (including patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, and other inventions) that are created at the employer’s expense on company time.

When Should Preferred Stock Be Converted into Common StockStocks-Shares-300x199

Many start-up corporations offer shares of stock in order to attract prospective employees and investors. Although there are several different types of stock out there, the two most common types include preferred stock and common stock. For more information about these types of stock, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of both, you should contact the experienced San Jose transactional attorneys at Structure Law Group today.

Preferred Stock

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In many instances, an offering memorandum – also commonly known as an OM or an “offering memo” – is something which is necessary in order to raise a certain amount of capital from corporate investors. This document is also one of the most important documents to hand to a company investor, in addition to the company’s business plan.

While the main purpose of a company’s business plan is to detail the company’s model and how the company plans to make money, the offering memorandum is a document which lays out what the company’s investors will obtain in return for their overall investment in the company. Once an offering memorandum is given to an investor, he or she can then choose to invest in the company based upon the financial information contained therein.

For more information about drafting a complete offering memorandum, you should contact the Silicon Valley corporate attorneys at Structure Law Group today.

Mergers between companies can get complicated. First, there are potential regulatory issues, at both the state and federal level. These regulatory issues can involve multiple agencies and be quite complex, requiring the use of lawyers specializing in such issues. This, of course, can drive expenses up considerably. Further, there are potential issues arising from differences between the companies merging, including differences in corporate culture. All of these issues require consideration, and many companies, especially companies engaging in their first merger, might not even be aware of what the potential issues are.

Regulatory Issues Often are the First and Most Significant Hurdle in a Merger

Under federal law, the Federal Trade Commission or the Department of Justice, depending upon the industry involved in the merger, must be notified of the merger if three tests are met. These tests are required under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act, or HSR, the antitrust law that governs mergers. The most important test under HSR regulations is the size of the merger. Depending on if the merger breaks a value threshold, then the federal government may need to be notified. If your merger is large enough to require reporting under the antitrust laws, you must make an initial filing of certain documents known as a 4(c) filing, referring to the section of the HSR Act that requires the filing.

Fotolia_79495533_Subscription_Monthly_M-300x200Any business that deals with customers – meaning all businesses – has customers that are habitually slow to pay for the goods or services that they purchase. Unlike retail transactions such as those that occur at a grocery store, many business-to-business transactions are not immediately completed. Customers don’t necessarily have to pay before the goods or services leave the building. Payment terms might be 30 days net or 60 days net, but the customer has time to pay for what they have purchased. But what can you do when those 30 or 60 days pass by without a payment? And what can you do if that time continues to drag on and months go by without a payment from your customer?

Don’t Delay with Delinquent Customers

There are many reasons – and excuses – for delayed payments or nonpayment by customers. If you invoice by mail, it is possible that the invoice was not delivered, or that it was lost internally at the customer’s business. Depending upon the size of the business, it is possible that no one at the customer’s business knows that a bill has not been paid. Reasons and excuses aside, your business cannot afford to operate without being paid.

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Mergers in the tech world are quite common. In a merger, one or more companies combine to form a new company (i.e., legal entity). Mergers can be complex and have many moving parts. The transaction can often include legal documents, valuation, key deliverables, operational logistics, regulatory matters, and financing and payments. A Silicon Valley M&A attorney can assist with your merger M&A transaction and handle multiple facets of the transaction.

Structuring the M&A Transaction

A merger and/or acquisition is a term that can be used to represent several types of transactions. Some M&A transactions might include:

Fotolia_172702870_Subscription_Monthly_M-1-300x187Successful merger and acquisition (M&A) transactions often rely on how well the parties involved communicate and how efficiently they can complete negotiations and due diligence. There are many steps that have to occur from initial interest in an M&A to full signature, payment, and completion of the transaction. Both parties, the buyer(s) and the seller(s), need to make sure the transaction is mutually beneficial. The Letter of Intent is one important step in this process.

Purpose of an LOI

The first step in formalizing any M&A transaction is usually a Letter of Intent (LOI). This document can sometimes also be called a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The LOI is a written document that outlines the buyer’s initial intentions and may include pertinent information and conditions related to the transaction. The delivery of an LOI to another party presents the seller’s intentions and begins potential negotiations. If you are the party issuing an LOI, you will want to make sure your letter is professional, clearly communicates your intentions, and sets forth realistic expectations. An experienced M&A attorney can assist in the drafting of your LOI.

Fotolia_171059478_Subscription_Monthly_M-300x200A right of first refusal is an important legal right in business law. It gives a certain party the opportunity to engage in a transaction before another party can do so. The right of first refusal can be used in many different contexts and can be extremely important for many companies. If a right of first refusal is granted and not subsequently honored, it can lead to a legal dispute.

If you are including a right of first refusal provision in a contract, you should always have a skilled business lawyer review the contract to ensure the provision properly protects your rights. We can also ensure the contract allows you the appropriate remedies should another party breach the contract provision.

Situations Involving a Right of First Refusal