San Jose Business Lawyers Blog

Articles Posted in Corporations

California law imposes fiduciary duties upon the officers and directors of a corporation which requires them to conduct themselves in a certain way with regard to the corporation and its shareholders. A fiduciary duty is the highest duty that the law can require and it requires those upon whom the duty is imposed to act only in the interest of the party to whom the duty is owed. The fiduciary duties of officers and directors of a corporation have been codified in California Corporations Code § 309(a), which reads:

“A director shall perform the duties of a director, including duties as a member of any committee of the board upon which the director may Integrity word cloud concept with honesty trust related tagsserve, in good faith, in a manner such director believes to be in the best interests of the corporation and its shareholders and with such care, including reasonable inquiry, as an ordinarily prudent person in a attorney like position would use under similar circumstances.”

 

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Many business owners rely on ideas, formulas, inventions, and other types of intellectual property (IP) in order to make a profit. In fact, IP can be one of the most valuable assets of a company. Your specific product, brand, and other identifiers are often the components that define you and set your business apart from others. Therefore, protecting your IP is extremely important to the success of your venture. In order to prevent others from misappropriating your valued intellectual property, you always want to obtain formal legal protections.

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There are many options for protecting your IP, and choosing the right one may be confusing for business owners who are not familiar with the relevant laws. Many business owners receive denials for their applications for patents, trademarks, and copyrights and do not know what their options are from there. Fortunately, an experienced business attorney can help you achieve trade secret status for your IP, which may actually be more beneficial than other protections in several ways. Continue Reading

If you’re thinking about starting a nonprofit, there are some steps to take before you begin. Forming a nonprofit organization is much like starting a regular corporation, except there are several additional steps you must take to ensure tax-exempt status, which includes a rigorous application process. Here are some common questions and their answers about forming a nonprofit organization.

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Forming a Nonprofit Organization: Common Questions and Answers

What does ‘501(c)3’ mean?

Being a 501(c)3 corporation means a company has been approved by the IRS as a charitable organization, exempt from specified taxes. The IRS may grant your nonprofit organization tax-exempt status if the nonprofit was formed for religious, charitable, scientific, literary or educational purposes, so long as the nonprofit does not distribute profits to individuals above reasonable compensation. Continue Reading

January 1st brought 930 new California laws which are enforceable in the new year. We’d like to share some of the new and relevant laws for 2015 that may affect you and your business activities. Here are 7 new federal and California laws that took effect January 1st.

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7 New Laws for 2015

  1. Driver’s Licensing

Experts expect more than a million applications for California driver’s licenses to flood the DMV offices following new laws allowing non-U.S. citizens without documentation to get driver’s licenses. Continue Reading

A B Corporation, also called a B Corp, Benefit Corp, or B Corp Certification, is a third-party designation for a socially responsible business that assures the public it has passed rigorous standards of environmental and social performance, as well as a commitment to fostering open communication and transparency. The Certifications are issued to for-profit companies by B Lab, a U.S. based non-profit.

Currently, there are over 1,000 Certified B Corps covering more than 60 industries. Becoming a B Corporation can be beneficial to your bottom line when considering business entrepreneurship. Here are some things to know about achieving B Corp Certification for your company.
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Provisions of B Corporations
Making sure you are in legal compliance is one of the first steps to starting a business. B Corps have provisions attached to certification such as establishing a public cause, transparency, and proof of continuing benefit to society and the environment. Continue Reading

Are you thinking about starting a business? The success or failure of your business venture depends on your ability to plan ahead, take action, and respond to what happens after your idea becomes a company. Here are 4 actions to consider on your path to business success.
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Building a Successful Business: 4 Steps
1. Clearly Define Your Vision and Goals

Business success comes through hard work and dedication. Having a clear vision and measurable goals is the first step. Write down your plans for the future of your company, both short term and long term. It can also be helpful to scout out your competition to see if your plans will hold up in the market. This is known as market research, and it will allow you to identify whether a similar product or idea is already out on the market. Continue Reading

In any business venture, compliance with applicable laws and regulations is essential. These vary significantly depending on your industry and the jurisdiction in which you operate. In some cases, you may be subject to licensing and permitting requirements on the federal, state, and municipal levels. While many entrepreneurs are understandably excited to begin operations, failure to obtain the required licenses or permits can have serious consequences. In some cases, noncompliance with the applicable business regulations in your jurisdiction could even result in criminal charges or significant fines, potentially putting you out of business.

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Regulations regarding business licenses and permits are often voluminous and difficult for even sophisticated business people to understand. Anyone considering starting or expanding a business in California should contact an experienced attorney to discuss their circumstances.

In the meantime, here is some information about some of the more commonly required business permits and licenses. Continue Reading

Breaking away from the rest and forming your own business is a dream for many people. Business entrepreneurship can be a risky but rewarding venture, and it’s possible to achieve great success in your new company. Although running a business takes a lot of hard work and has challenges, you can reach a high level of success. Here are four keys to achieving great things as a business owner, as well as some advice from successful entrepreneurs.

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Business Entrepreneurship: 4 Keys to Achieving Success

1. Hire a Lawyer

“Surround yourself with great mentors.”-Thalej Vasishta, CEO, Immigration Lawyer

Sound advice and a strong team to lean on are essential for entrepreneurs. One of the first things you should do when starting your company is hire a lawyer. Choosing a business entity and licensing can be intricate, so have all paperwork looked over before making big decisions. A good business lawyer will be able to guide you through the whole process and assist you in protecting your intellectual property rights along the way. Continue Reading

Forming a corporation may seem like a lot of work but the process isn’t too difficult. In this blog post we’ll walk you through some important steps to incorporate in California. Every state is different so make sure to check with the Secretary of State’s Office in your area before getting started.

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1. Pick a Name

The name you pick for your corporation must not be the same, or similar to, one already on file with the California Secretary of State. You can search on the Secretary of State’s website to see if the name you’re thinking of using is original. You should also check beyond the state, e.g. nationally and even internationally. A name that is the same as, or similar to, one used in another state or country can pose problems.

2. File Articles of Incorporation

Be sure to include the corporation’s name, purpose, name and address of a registered agent plus the number of shares the corporation is authorized to issue.

3. Appoint a Registered Agent

An agent is an individual or corporation that agrees to accept legal papers should your business be sued. You can find a list of registered agents by visiting the Secretary of State’s website. You can also choose one of the company’s owners to be a registered agent for your corporation.

4. Prepare Bylaws

Bylaws dictate how your corporation will be run. You’re not legally required to file them, but most banks, investors, and others won’t do business with you if they can’t see how your company operates.

5. Appoint a Board of Directors

Among other things, this board will appoint officers, adopt bylaws and determine the corporation’s fiscal year. The number of board members can vary, within certain parameters, and the directors need not be shareholders of the company, though they often are.

6. Issue Stock

Every shareholder should receive paper stock certificates. The stock is a security, and therefore, subject to state and federal securities laws. Properly complying with securities laws is an important step and one your attorney can help you with. Proper compliance will avoid liability for securities fraud in the future.

This list is by no means comprehensive but it does provide a working outline. For further assistance visit Structure Law Group’s website.

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.

A merger or acquisition can be a great way to grow your business. Joining forces or purchasing another company increases your market share and potential profits. There’s no real way to know if the venture will pay off. However, the proper due diligence can provide reassurance that the move you’re making is a good one. Due diligence is a multi-step process, so in this post we’re going to focus on just one part: liabilities.

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Understanding Liabilities

Any merger or acquisition comes with a degree of risk. Liabilities are the debts and obligations incurred through the course of doing business. Loans are considered a liability as are accounts payable and accrued expenses. It’s important to take a look at the total number and dollar value of all liabilities. Also, look at the company’s payment history. Are bills paid on time? Is there a record of default? These are red flags that should give you pause. Remember, once you’ve assumed liabilities the responsibility is yours.

Unrecorded Liabilities

An unrecorded liability is exactly as it sounds. This type of liability won’t show up on any records or accounting statements. Before you call off your merger or acquisition, understand that unrecorded liabilities are normal. A common example is vacation time. Let’s say an employee rolls over vacation time and, come retirement, hasn’t used it all. He or she will be owed money in exchange for the hours. This can be a substantial cost if enough employees have banked their hours. The best way to find out about a company’s unrecorded liabilities is to ask the right questions and request the relevant documents, or you can hire an experienced attorney.

Due diligence is a critical component of any merger or acquisition. Failure to do your homework can have dire financial consequences.

About Structure Law Group

Structure Law Group is a San Jose based firm that specializes in business issues including business formations, commercial contracts and litigation.