Articles Tagged with California Business Owners

AdobeStock_419006596-300x200Equity compensation is an important tool employers use to attract – and retain – talented employees. Before you begin offering stock options, it is important to consider the amount of stock being issued to employees and how issuing it could affect the value of your business. There are many ways to structure an equity compensation package. Consult with a California startup lawyer to structure compensation packages that are best for your business, your future funding rounds, your shareholders, and your employees.

Before issuing any equity compensation, it is important to understand how this will affect the value of your business. Many businesses consider stock options as an inexpensive part of a compensation package. There is no accounting cost and no cash outlay required, so stock options might seem like an attractive option. There is even an added tax benefit: the difference between the stock price and the exercise price is a tax deduction to the business. But the National Bureau of Economic Research reports that this perception does not form an accurate picture of the actual economic cost of stock options. Understand the long-term costs of stock options – and how they will affect the valuation of your business over its lifetime – before making any decisions about how many employees will be awarded what amount of stock options.

The Total Percentage of Your Employee Stock Options

AdobeStock_288866301-300x200When real estate is transferred in California, it generally constitutes a change in ownership that triggers a reassessment of the taxable value of that property. There are, however, a few key exclusions that can be used to avoid this trigger and protect your business from added tax liability. If you are considering transferring any property to or from your business, be sure to consult with an attorney about the best way to do this. The investment of attorney’s fees can pay dividends in reduced legal and tax liabilities. Errors, however, can lead to costly reassessments, in addition to tax penalties and interest on the added amount due.

Protecting Property Through the Creation of a Business Entity

There are a few different ways to transfer property to a business entity without triggering a reassessment. One is the legal entity exclusion. This rule allows you to avoid a reassessment if 50 percent or less of the interest in a legal entity is transferred to another legal entity. So if real property is held by a legal entity, up to half of the interest in that legal entity can be transferred without triggering a reassessment. If 51 percent or more of the legal interest is transferred, there will be a reassessment. The strategy is often used by business owners who are creating a new legal entity without changing the ownership of their business.

For California business owners, knowing what expenses are deductible from tax liability is not just a sound financial strategy. It can also prevent criminal liability for tax fraud and other white collar crimes. Ensure that all your financial and legal interests are protected by consulting with an experienced California tax law attorney.

expense-e1508532021260-300x198
Common Deductions

Tax liability is a function of a company’s profit less its operating and business expenses. These expenses are known as the taxpayer’s deductions. Thus, the greater a company’s deductions, the less overall tax liability it will have. This causes many companies and business owners to push the boundaries of allowable business deductions. While this can reduce the company’s initial tax liability, it can also result in a time-consuming audit and heavy fines. In serious cases, it can even result in criminal liability. It is, therefore, very important for business owners to ensure that they are making appropriate, lawful deductions.