Articles Tagged with San Jose business litigation attorney

AdobeStock_257476584-300x200Litigation is a costly enterprise for any business owner. It is important to work with an experienced business litigator who knows how to mitigate litigation expenses wherever possible. New statutes – such as the one that creates informal discovery conferences – can be used to help resolve discovery disputes and mitigate the over cost of business litigation.

What is an Informal Discovery Conference?

Recently, the California Code of Civil Procedure was amended to allow civil litigants to request an informal discovery conference. While the discovery process is governed by clear rules and procedures, the parties are often expected to resolve differences amongst themselves. If they cannot, they must let the court decide their differences. This is traditionally done by discovery motions. If, for example, one party refused to procedure a document requested by the other, the requesting party could file a motion to compel with the court. The attorneys would then prepare written motions to the court, make arguments at the hearing, and wait for the judge’s ruling. All of this results in added attorney’s’ fees.

A “fraudulent,” or more accurately “voidable” transfer, is a transfer by a party (the “debtor”) of some interest in property with the goal or effect of preventing a creditor or creditors from reaching the transferred interest to satisfy their claim or claims.

Signing contract
What Law Governs “Fraudulent” or “Voidable” Conveyances/Transfers?

Fraudulent conveyances are governed primarily by the Uniform Voidable Transactions Act (UVTA), which replaced the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (UFTA) in California as of January 1, 2016.  The UVTA applies to transfers made or obligations incurred after January 1, 2016.  The UFTA will continue to apply to transfers made or obligations incurred prior to January 1, 2016.  One of the most noticeable changes made in the UVTA is the removal of the word “fraudulent” from the title and body of the act. This change emphasizes that a transfer may be, and often is, voidable even in the absence of any sort of improper intent by the debtor or the transferees.